noah astern

Arms like Arnie!

Meet Noah, the St Andrews student built like Arnie and who trains like him too. We caught up with Noah to find out what the secret is, and what we found out was daunting to say the least. Read on to find out how high volume might be the key to the size gains you’re looking for…

Name, Uni, Course, Age.

 

Noah Stern, University of St Andrews, Mlitt in Middle East, Caucasus, Central Asia, Security Studies, 22

 

Noah Astern (2 of 17)

 

About you, hobbies, interests, interesting facts.

 

I am a post-grad student.  I am from the United States, born and raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico (the land of Breaking Bad.)  My undergraduate studies were completed at the University of New Hampshire, that’s near Boston.  I am a proud fan of the most hated sports team in America, the New England Patriots.  In terms of hobbies, when I’m not in the gym or studying I like to read and I race sailboats.

 

How many years you’ve been training, what got you into training, what were your goals when you started, what are your goals now.

 

I have been training seriously for five years.  However, I did start training more casually in high school for sports.  I was always the smallest guy on the various teams I played on so I decided to start lifting as an avenue to get bigger and perform better in sports.  However, I had very little clue what I was doing.  I had a general understanding of some basic lifts.  In fact, I didn’t even have access to a gym.  I was able to purchase some adjustable dumbbells and a used bench and barbell.  However, as I moved to university I realized that I wanted to continue lifting.  The first split that I built was…. Terrifying. But I’ll get into that later on.  My goals are to be happy.  Which is an odd gym goal but training makes me happy.  I stopped doing sports when I came to uni and the gym provides a competitive outlet.  There’s always someone bigger or stronger at the gym.  I find that person and chase them.  In terms of tangible goals, I’m hoping to get a 227kg deadlift by August while maintaining a bodyweight similar to what I’m at now.  For the longest time, I had the goal of hitting 90kg for bodyweight but that goal has come and gone at least three training cycles now.  A super long term goal would be to hit a four plate bench press.

 

Noah Astern (7 of 17)

 

Bodyweight, what are your most impressive lists, circumstances – chest, arms, waist.

 

Currently, I’m sitting around 93kg but that’s been going up pretty continuously. My waist is 32 inches, my chest is 42 inches, my arms are around 17 inches.

 

How often do you train? What’s your training split? What’s your training plan? What’s your approach to training?

 

I have to preface this by saying that my training is not in any way based on science.  I train six days a week. My split is currently:

 

  • legs (squat focused)
  • back/traps/biceps
  • chest/shoulders/triceps
  • legs (deadlift focused)
  • back/traps/biceps
  • chest/shoulders/triceps.

 

There is some change in where I place my leg days depending on how I’m feeling.  Each workout usually lasts around three hours.  While this may seem like overtraining, I have found that if I diet appropriately and get enough sleep I’m able to function.  My approach to training is very much power building centered.  While my overall strategy is not backed by science I do try to read as many studies as possible and then apply the aspects that I find interesting to my program. If I feel they are working then I keep them, otherwise, I change them out.  To start out when I put my program together I first had to decide on what I wanted my splits to be.  When I first started lifting I was doing upper body one day and lower body the other and doing this six days a week.  While being incredibly time-consuming, this also resulted in genuine overtraining.  While I was able to gain some size, the numbers for my lifts weren’t improving.

 

So, my second year of university I decided to change things up.  First off, I started tracking my workouts.  The second major change was to move to the current split I have.  Then I had to decide what movements to program.  I based this on two principles, one grounded in strength and one in aesthetics.  First, bodybuilding is about symmetry.  This means that everything should receive equal training initially.  Then as training progresses you can decide to change things up if one muscle is lagging.  The second principle is that every muscle or movement has a reciprocal. Think about it this way, in the bench press the weight is being pressed away from your body. The reciprocal to this would be a row.  However, in the bench press, your back plays a major role in the eccentric part of the movement.  So from both a strength and aesthetic perspective, training the various movements and muscles equally will result in both a well rounded and strong physique.  This resulted in the current grouping I have which is a slightly modified push/pull split.  However, I like to train legs on their own day because both the deadlift and squat recruit heavily from muscles utilized in upper body work.  In order to maximize the amount of weight I can lift, I place squats and deadlifts on their own days. 

 

Noah Astern (10 of 17)

 

The biggest difference between my workouts I did in 2016 vs what I’m doing now is the volume.  A major part of lifting for me is that it is an outlet for whatever stress I have in life. Be it academic or otherwise.  So, I like to leave the gym feeling tired. The result was that I kept progressively adding more and more sets, reps, and movements.  In doing this I also noticed something, my weight was going up at a quicker rate as were my measurements and lifts.  This is again where I would like to emphasize the importance of sleep and diet.  One of the most important things you can do for yourself when training like this is getting eight hours of sleep.  In uni life, this can be a difficult thing to do.  This means prioritizing but also set rules.  In my schedule, I have three inflexible time constraints. Class time, gym, and sleep. I then build everything else around those three things. This could mean lifting at odd times: early in the morning, late into the night, or maybe in the three hours between classes in the middle of the day.  Anyways, back to how I designed my program. 

 

The next important thing is to sort out the organization of each workout.  One of the major cornerstones of just about every training program is – always begin with multi-joint exercises and then move into isolation work. In powerlifting terms, starts with your big three lifts and then move on to accessories.  So for leg day, this means starting with squats or deadlifts and then getting more and more isolated until ending with leg extensions/curls.  On a back day, start with pull-ups and then move into lat pulldowns or rows.  For chest, start with barbell bench press and then go to incline and decline variations. 

 

This is an ideal place to bring up that every muscle can be hit in different ways.  Without going too heavily into anatomy and physiology, you may think “oh there’s a bicep, or a pec” and you just need to train that in some way.  But these larger muscles are divided up into different smaller muscles. So for the bench, the chest can be broken into three major different groups.  To get a solid chest you want to make sure to train all aspects of the pectoral muscle.  This means not just flat bench but also incline and decline.  This means that I get my volume for all my different muscle groups through including multiple exercises for each.  When designing a program I strongly recommend familiarizing yourself with the various muscle groups and how they are broken up as well as how to target them.  So now I have what movements I’m going to do.  Now I have to decide on rep schemes.

 

This part I do very much by feel but ground it in some basic principles.  If I’m looking for hypertrophy then I don’t go below six reps.  If I’m going below six reps for an exercise, I know I need to drop the weight.  In terms of sets, I never do less than four for any movement.  While this may seem unbelievably time-consuming, if you keep rest time to thirty seconds or less those sets will fly by.  For any of the big three lifts though, I do allow my reps to drop into the 2-4 range.  I’m focusing on strength here so I’m trying to pack as much weight as I can on the bar.  However, I always warm up in a higher rep range with lighter weight and then increase the weight and drop my reps as I move to my working sets.  I usually end my big three lifts with a few deload sets where I’ve moved back to light weight and high reps and try to focus on maintaining my form even in a fatigued state.  For my movements focused on hypertrophy I start at the heaviest weight I can manage and still get 10-12 solid reps in. Then, I work my way down, be it the stack or dumbbell rack staying on weight until I can only get six to eight reps.  Then I drop the weight again.  This is the flexible portion of my rep scheme.  After having done one movement for a muscle group in this fashion I then stick to a fairly strict four set scheme.  I’ll stay on weight until I can get it consistently for four sets of ten to twelve reps.  Once I’ve reached this point it means the next time I do that lift I can up the weight.        

 

Noah Astern (14 of 17)

 

Training cycles over time. Traveling home and losing weight then regaining.

 

So my training cycles are a bit bizarre.  For context, uni gyms in the US are free to students and private gyms are exorbitantly expensive and almost impossible to use for just a month or two at a time. So any time I had a school vacation I would have to stop training.  Specifically, this meant summer and winter break.  So if I were to designate cycles Id say I have two major training cycles with about a month off between the two and then about three months off in the summer.  However, my summer job has been working in a boat repair shop and a sailing instructor. This job keeps me on my feet and active outside all day.  The result is I lose a significant amount of mass, dropping as much as ten to twelve kilos. But, I still keep my diet focused and able to stay fairly lean.  Then, once I return to uni, I resume training and thanks to muscle memory I am able to gain back the weight and strength relatively quickly and then start making gains.  The way I view it, fall semester is going to be spent mostly getting back to where I was before the summer.  If I can be back on track by the midpoint then I can spend the second half of the semester hitting PRs and gaining weight beyond my previous top weight.  Spring semester is then where I usually make the biggest leaps in size and body weight.  While a month off isn’t great, the rebound time is really about a month. What this means is that within a school year I will gain about ten kg, lose five, and then gain another ten. My body naturally wants to sit around 77kg, sometimes less, at around 12% bodyfat.  The result is that after every summer I have lost more weight but gain back even more weight faster than the previous year. Below is a screenshot of a graph of what my weight has looked like over the last four years.

 

Noah Stern

 

Where do you train? How is it?

 

I train at my university’s gym.  I was a bit shocked that I had to pay to gain access to the gym but as it was a one time fee I wasn’t too bothered.  While the gym is small and is lacking in terms of diversity of equipment and weight, I am able to manage.  I’ve trained in many different places and the key is being able to adapt.  This is where a solid base knowledge of the body and exercises comes in handy (with some help from the internet.)

 

Noah Astern (13 of 17)

 

Favourite bodypart to train? Favourite exercise?

 

This may come as a bit of a shock to anyone who knows me but my favorite body part to train is probably chest or legs.  In terms of most enjoyable lifts, I love any of the big three.  I’m a competitive person by nature.  Physique is very subjective but putting more weight on the bar than someone else is very objective.  However, I will say it’s hard to beat a killer bicep pump.  For this my favorite is probably dumbbell curls straight into a superset of hammer curls at the same weight, working my way down the rack.  My strongest lift, however, is the bench press.  Currently, my bench is sitting around 142kg for a solid double. 

 

Worst bodypart/exercise to train?

 

My worst body part to train is definitely shoulders.  This is because I have a partially torn rotator cuff in my right shoulder.  This makes shoulder development and symmetry particularly difficult for me.  In terms of where I struggle most otherwise I’d have to say squats.  My leverages aren’t great so I really struggle to lift heavy weight and squat to depth.  My gym is full of Olympic weightlifters though who do a great job keeping me honest.

 

What do you eat? Tell us about your diet?

 

I eat everything.  Not really but I wish I did.  I survive on what my coworkers at my old job termed slop.  Slop is brown rice, frozen mixed vegetables, and chicken or turkey.  I usually cook it in a pan with some olive oil and all the spices I can get. I love spicy food so my cooking is always heavy on hot sauce and chili pepper.  I do have two variations of slop. One is spicy and more Mexican oriented.  The other is more garlic and soy sauce based and looks more like fried rice.  Throw in a couple of eggs to increase calories and protein.  Basically, I know approximately how many calories I need and what my macros should look like.  Then, I eat the same thing every day.  Dinner is slop plus some raw spinach.  Lunch is usually whole wheat pasta with ground turkey.  Sometimes I’ll throw in some marinara sauce.  Breakfast is usually a basic porridge and sometimes a Maximuscle Promax Protein Bar or a few eggs.

 

maximuscle promax lean

 

Favourite food? Worst food?

 

This is tough.  I’m gonna approach this from a cheat meal perspective because what’s life without a cheat meal?  My ideal cheat meal is a big hamburger, chips, and a milkshake.  In fact, unless I’m cutting I usually have a cheat meal like this every one or two weeks.  My least favorite food is mushrooms.  Don’t know why they just freak me out.  I also don’t love certain types of fish.  In terms of everyday food though chicken is definitely my favourite.  It’s basically a blank pallet. You can make it taste however you want.

 

How do you fit this all in with uni lifestyle? Triumphs and struggles.

 

Time management and routine.  These two things keep everything in line. I live and die by my google calendar. I have everything down to meals and study time scheduled.  My biggest triumph was probably my second and third years of undergrad.  I maintained an intense training schedule while also pursuing a degree in Political Science and a degree in Russian.  Then on top of this I was a member of my universities sailing team which meant practice every day of the week for three hours plus regattas on weekends.  Now, at St Andrews, I only have class two days a week so I have plenty of time for training, studying, and this bizarre thing called a social life.  One thing that I always have to focus on is to not let my training impact my studies and to not let my studies impact my training.  What I mean by this is that sometimes I do have to shorten my split around exams.  But it also means that when I’m in the gym I can’t think about studying and let it distract me.  I once was worried about a deadline for a class and lost focus mid bench and my bracing and form went out the window causing me to drop about 138kg across my midsection (don’t bench with false grip kids.) 

 

Noah Astern (5 of 17)

 

What’s it like being a MASS member?

 

I was apprehensive about joining MASS at first.  I just wasn’t sure what it was and whether or not it was open to postgrads.  However, after seeing MASS gear all over the gym I struck up a conversation with President Dennis.  I decided to join and it was one of the best decisions I’ve made here.  I was immediately welcomed into the group.  I know I always have a spot in the gym and have a group of people to talk training with or hang out.

 

Noah Astern (17 of 17)

 

Do you think everyone should train as long as you do if they want to get huge pumped like you?

 

This is an interesting question.  I joke with friends, some of whom are studying training and anatomy and physiology at uni that my training defies science.  What I do works for me.  If you’re crazy enough to try it then go ahead. Volume is key to gaining size as well as keeping your muscles confused, be it through different movements, sets, reps, or weights.  However, if someone does give this a try please let me know how it goes.  I’d love to find out if what I do works just for me or if this is a replicable thing.  Also something I forgot to mention above in discussing how I built my program, always listen to your body.  If something feels off, be it a lift or a muscle, something is wrong.  Deload weeks are key.  Maybe that movement isn’t great for your body. Or your mobility is impaired.  Don’t be afraid to experiment until you find what works for you. 

 

Advice for people trying to go arnie-mode also?

 

I’m just guessing but I think this question is about arms.  So I’ll just lay out what I do. I start with heavy barbell curls for 4 sets of 6-8 reps.  Then I do heavy dumbbell hammer curls at 4×6-10 (this is where if I can do it for ten the weight goes up next time.) Whatever weight I did for dumbbell curls I take off 4-6 kg and then dumbbell curl that. I work my way down the rack from that weight. I usually do all my reps on one side and then the other.  So it would look like 8 reps right arm 8 reps left arm and then back to my right arm for as many reps hammer curl (usually 4-6) and the same for left.  Then, starting with my left arm I repeat the above process. After having done these two sets I move down 2kg and repeat.  When I hit the bottom of the rack I do two sets of zercher curls and then four sets of 7’s (if you haven’t done these look them up. If you don’t feel like vomiting you aren’t doing it right.)  Finally, I finish it all off with preacher or concentration curls done on a bench.  Here, the weight is light, I’m talking 8-10 kg.  I focus heavily on the eccentric motion try to draw it out as long as possible.  I then slowly curl the weight back up.  Doing this properly I usually won’t be able to get more than four reps.  For triceps I follow a similar methodology but instead work my way down the cable stack.  The only thing I’ll say is to remember, the tricep has three heads, be sure to hit all of them.  Also, watch your form for tricep work.  It’s very easy to injure your elbows and that can have a significant impact on your training for a long time.

 

Noah Astern (15 of 17)

 

Can we see your full program?

 

Here you go, thanks for reading! If you try the program I hope you enjoy it and please do hit me up to let me know how you found it @asternlook.

 

Adjust the weights to your own level of strength.

 

Legs (Squat Focused)

 

Total Volume: 71,020 kgs
Total Sets: 46
Total Reps: 878

 

** Barbell Squat **
– 70.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 90.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 140.0 kgs x 5 reps
– 150.0 kgs x 3 reps
– 155.0 kgs x 2 reps
– 160.0 kgs x 1 rep
– 140.0 kgs x 4 reps
– 135.0 kgs x 5 reps
– 130.0 kgs x 5 reps

 

** Barbell Front Squat **
– 100.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 100.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 100.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 100.0 kgs x 4 reps

 

** SLDL **
– 120.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 10 reps

 

** Barbell Lunge **
– 60.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 65.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 65.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 65.0 kgs x 6 reps

 

** Barbell Calf Raise **
– 65.0 kgs x 50 reps
– 65.0 kgs x 40 reps
– 65.0 kgs x 40 reps
– 65.0 kgs x 30 reps

 

** Seated Dumbell Calf Raise **
– 25.0 kgs x 60 reps
– 25.0 kgs x 60 reps
– 25.0 kgs x 60 reps
– 25.0 kgs x 60 reps

 

** Machine Leg Press **
– 190.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 190.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 190.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 190.0 kgs x 12 reps

 

** Machine Leg Press Calf Raises **
– 190.0 kgs x 25 reps
– 190.0 kgs x 24 reps
– 190.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 190.0 kgs x 15 reps

 

** Seated Leg Curl Machine **
– 75.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Leg Extension Machine **
– 75.0 kgs x 40 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 36 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 30 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 35 reps

 

 Back, Traps, Biceps (x2 per week)

 

Total Volume: 111,418 kgs
Total Sets: 114
Total Reps: 1715

 

** Pull Up **
– 20 reps
– 20.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 20.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 20.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Chin Up **
– 20.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 20.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 20.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 18 reps

 

** Lat Pulldown **
– 90.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 90.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 90.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 90.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 85.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 85.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 85.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 85.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 70.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 70.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 70.0 kgs x 7 reps
– 65.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 65.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 65.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 65.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 60.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 60.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 60.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 55.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 55.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 55.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 50.0 kgs x 12 reps [Behind head]
– 50.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 8 reps [Close grip]
– 80.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 70.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Floor Cable Row **
– 91.0 kgs x 40 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 40 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 35 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 30 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 30 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 50 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 30 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 40 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 40 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 14 reps

 

** Landmine Row **
– 75.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 75.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Barbell Row **
– 77.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Dumbbell Row **
– 44.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 44.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 44.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 44.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Straight-Arm Cable Pushdown **
– 77.0 kgs x 24 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 18 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 12 reps

 

** Cable Face Pull **
– 77.0 kgs x 40 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 35 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 50 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 50 reps

 

** Barbell Shrug **
– 120.0 kgs x 40 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 30 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 30 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 35 reps

 

** Dumbell Shrug **
– 48.0 kgs x 36 reps
– 48.0 kgs x 30 reps
– 48.0 kgs x 32 reps
– 48.0 kgs x 35 reps

 

** Barbell Curl **
– 55.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 55.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 55.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 55.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Dumbbell Hammer Curl **
– 32.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 32.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 32.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 32.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Dumbbell Curl **
– 28.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 28.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 26.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 26.0 kgs x 7 reps
– 24.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 24.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 22.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 22.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 20.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 20.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 18.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 18.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 16.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 16.0 kgs x 9 reps
– 14.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 14.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 14.0 kgs x 8 reps [Zs]
– 14.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 12.0 kgs x 21 reps [7s]
– 12.0 kgs x 21 reps
– 10.0 kgs x 21 reps
– 10.0 kgs x 21 reps

 

** Dumbbell Concentration Curl **
– 10.0 kgs x 5 reps
– 10.0 kgs x 5 reps
– 10.0 kgs x 5 reps
– 10.0 kgs x 5 reps

 

Legs (Deadlift Focused)

 

Total Volume: 71,475 kgs
Total Sets: 40
Total Reps: 658

 

** Sumo Deadlift **
– 70.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 140.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 170.0 kgs x 5 reps
– 180.0 kgs x 1 rep
– 190.0 kgs x 1 rep
– 200.0 kgs x 1 rep
– 204.0 kgs x 1 rep
– 201.0 kgs x 1 rep
– 170.0 kgs x 5 reps

 

** Box Squat **
– 120.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 4 reps
– 120.0 kgs x 5 reps

 

** Barbell Front Squat **
– 90.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 90.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 90.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 90.0 kgs x 10 reps

 

** Dumbbell Lunge **
– 64.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 64.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 64.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 64.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Dumbell Calf Raise **
– 64.0 kgs x 50 reps
– 64.0 kgs x 50 reps

 

** Machine Leg Press **
– 180.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 180.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 180.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 180.0 kgs x 12 reps

 

** Machine Leg Press Calf Raises **
– 140.0 kgs x 60 reps
– 140.0 kgs x 50 reps
– 140.0 kgs x 50 reps
– 140.0 kgs x 50 reps

 

** Seated Leg Curl Machine **
– 80.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 10 reps

 

** Leg Extension Machine **
– 80.0 kgs x 30 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 34 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 30 reps
– 80.0 kgs x 20 reps

 

Chest, Shoulders, Triceps (2x per week)

 

Total Volume: 53,346 kgs
Total Sets: 100
Total Reps: 1263

 

** Flat Barbell Bench Press **
– 60.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 90.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 100.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 130.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 140.0 kgs x 5 reps
– 142.0 kgs x 4 reps
– 144.0 kgs x 3 reps
– 113.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 100.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 100.0 kgs x 14 reps

 

** Flat Dumbbell Bench Press **
– 36.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 36.0 kgs x 18 reps
– 36.0 kgs x 18 reps
– 36.0 kgs x 18 reps

 

** Incline Dumbbell Bench Press **
– 46.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 46.0 kgs x 7 reps
– 46.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 46.0 kgs x 7 reps

 

** Pectoral Dip **
– 20.0 kgs x 16 reps
– 20.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 20.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 20 reps

 

** Cable Fly High **
– 30.0 kgs x 30 reps
– 30.0 kgs x 22 reps
– 30.0 kgs x 16 reps
– 30.0 kgs x 16 reps

 

** Cable Fly **
– 23.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 23.0 kgs x 18 reps
– 23.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 23.0 kgs x 12 reps

 

** Standing Barbell Press **
– 70.0 kgs x 7 reps
– 70.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 70.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 70.0 kgs x 5 reps

 

** Seated Dumbbell Press **
– 36.0 kgs x 9 reps
– 36.0 kgs x 7 reps
– 36.0 kgs x 7 reps
– 36.0 kgs x 7 reps

 

** Rear Delt Dumbbell Raise **
– 16.0 kgs x 40 reps
– 16.0 kgs x 45 reps
– 16.0 kgs x 36 reps
– 16.0 kgs x 36 reps

 

** Arnold Dumbbell Press **
– 22.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 22.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 22.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 22.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** V-Bar Push Down **
– 91.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 91.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 84.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 84.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 84.0 kgs x 16 reps
– 84.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Machine Curl Bar Push Down **
– 84.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 84.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 77.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Reverse Curl Bar Push Down **
– 77.0 kgs x 4 reps
– 70.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 63.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 63.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 63.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 56.0 kgs x 10 reps

 

** Rope Push Down **
– 57.0 kgs x 10 reps
– 57.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 50.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 50.0 kgs x 4 reps
– 43.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 43.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 43.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 43.0 kgs x 6 reps
– 36.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 36.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

** Machine Rope Overhead Press **
– 36.0 kgs x 16 reps
– 36.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 30.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 30.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 30.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 30.0 kgs x 20 reps
– 30.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 30.0 kgs x 30 reps

 

** EZ-Bar Skullcrusher **
– 31.0 kgs x 18 reps
– 31.0 kgs x 18 reps
– 31.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 31.0 kgs x 14 reps

 

** Upright EZ-Bar Row **
– 31.0 kgs x 18 reps
– 31.0 kgs x 18 reps
– 31.0 kgs x 14 reps
– 31.0 kgs x 14 reps

 

** Dumbell Kickback **
– 16.0 kgs x 16 reps
– 16.0 kgs x 12 reps
– 16.0 kgs x 12 reps

 

** Lateral Dumbbell Raise **
– 14.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 14.0 kgs x 8 reps
– 14.0 kgs x 8 reps

 

So there you have it, the workings of a student who truly is built like Arnie. Dedication, discipline, time out, daily slop for dinner and a whole lot of volume. thanks, Noah for writing this for us. If you enjoyed this artcle show your support for MASS and share with a friend!

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dennis goodztov

Top of the Table – Dennis Goodztov

From struggling to ratify to top of the table, MASS St Andrews president Dennis shares his reaction to finding out St Andrews is top of the Ultimate MASS league going into term 1 and gives his thoughts and advice on what he feels got them there.

Tell us a bit about yourself – name, age, Uni, course, interests outside of gym,

My name is Dennis, I’m 21 (22 in a few days), I’m at the University of St Andrews in my 4th year studying Astrophysics. Outside of the gym, I play some football, I used to play Ice Hockey. Astronomy is a hobby of mine as well as being what I study, I like to look up at the stars, back where I live in Switzerland I have a telescope.

Congrats on first place in Ultimate MASS in the Freshers period mark up. How does it feel?

It feels great. To be honest, I wasn’t expecting this at all, I felt like as a new society it would be hard for us. But honestly it feels amazing, I feel like we’ve accomplished much more than we expected at this point. I couldn’t have done it without the rest of the committee, I’ve only had time to message my vice president at the time of this interview but as soon as I tell them all I know they’ll be as excited as I am. It’s definitely motivation to keep going and win it at the end.

dennis goodztov

What would you attribute your success in Ultimate MASS thus far to?

I think being very vocal with personal interactions with members as well as on social media platforms helps. Keeping everyone updated as much as possible, especially on social media, I think this is a big reason as to why we’re doing well. It’s as simple as approaching people in the gym and being open with them and just saying like “hey, we’re doing these events” and just reminding everyone at every possible opportunity what we’re planning to do. The more we communicate with our members the more motivation we have to create events and stuff that will leave an impression on our members. It’s about a lot more than just getting a goodie bag from Maximuscle, which we love haha, but on a bigger scale, it’s about following the vision of MASS and creating a community of people who inspire and support each other both in the gym and outside of the gym. I think just putting that message across as much as possible and making events fun and exciting for people is the key. A combination of all of these things.

 

You also won the award for most clothing items purchased, winning a professional photoshoot. What advice would you give to other committees trying to get their sales up?

I don’t think I’m in any position to give advice haha. But honestly as the start of the year, we were a new society, I bought myself a t-shirt, a vest and joggers. I wore them in the gym pretty much as much as I could to the point that was allowed by personal hygiene haha. People genuinely saw me in these clothes and said “oh waw that merch looks cool it’s really cool that you have your own St Andrews branded merch” and it was kind of an advertisement that I just had to wear the clothes to get. I don’t know how much that counts as advice as it’s quite straightforward, however I did get quite a significant number of people come up to me and ask “what’s MASS, I see you wearing this stuff” and eventually these guys and girls who come up to me asking what’s MASS eventually they ended up joining MASS and I’d tell them ‘hey get on board with this, get some merch, get a hoodie, get this, get that, feel really integrated in our society’. And we just got so many people putting in orders, I set deadlines for each order and I had quite a significant number of people get back to me about the 1st deadline and then I kind of said look if we can enough interest for a second order then I’ll do a second order this semester and we got a lot of interest in that too. I think I counted almost £1,000 in clothes. I think it’s about bringing across this community feel more than anything and say hey, get a hoodie, be a part of MASS, immerse yourself in this community.

 

Eventually, I’m aiming to have one half of the gym doing their own thing then have the other half just MASS haha.

 


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Your society is new to this year. What obstacles did you encounter setting up and how did you get through them?

This is a long story that starts last year but I’ll try and keep it short. Last year I put in all the paperwork that I needed to (to the SU) for the society, I put it all in very quickly and I don’t think there was anything wrong with my paperwork. However, I will say that the active society’s officer at the time in the Union didn’t really do the only job they had to do. I got emails from them saying “yes your society has been put on the agenda we’ll talk over it and you’ll either get leave to proceed or we’ll request revisions” but they just never got back to me. Something that should have taken about a week took months and then I eventually got the leave to proceed last year which is what you need to go onto the affiliation process. Then I went about trying to set up the bank account, the signatories for Committee, and that was an entirely different obstacle again… I emailed the societies officer who stopped responding to my emails altogether basically showing no faith in the society, so I went about doing the banking business myself and that was again overcomplicated by the accounts, asking me for documents I didn’t have and just had no way of getting. It was very confusing to me as I didn’t think it was necessary and as it’s something all societies have to do it shouldn’t be that hard.

And eventually, it dragged on to the point where I had to focus on my academic studies and put it aside as I wasn’t really getting assisted from the SU. I was being offered assistance from the students who are now a part of the committee, but for me to ask them to fix something when I don’t know what’s wrong with it just didn’t feel right. So I had to put it off just because of my academics.

But then this year I went about the whole thing again. There was a new societies officer who was infinitely more helpful, he sped everything up for me as he knew what I went through last year, so I went to the bank again where I encountered the same probably but this time I spoke up a little more about it and questioned them, I just told them “why do you need this, where would I obtain this” and eventually they owned up and said ‘hey this is our mistake we don’t need this’ which apparently no one could tell me last year.

So I got signatures at the bank, elected our committee at an AGM and we finally got ratification earlier this year.

Stay persistent with it because if it drags on too long you’ll face the same issues that I did. Once its set up it’s set up, it’s not necessarily going to be an easy process, but I’m just happy to be able to be affiliated now.

What’s your favourite thing about being a MASS President?

Probably being able to wear the hoodie with my name and ‘President’ on the back haha :).

dennis goodztov

 

What are your personal goals and gym goals now and in the future?

I’ve made a decision on my future quite a long time ago in that I’m going to pursue academics and academia, I want to work in academia and specifically astrophysics which is what I’m doing now.

In terms of my training, I’ve come a long way since I started. I started at Uni, and at first, it was a way to kill off stress I had from everyday life and it’s become more and more that as I’ve gone through my university career as work gets harder and you get more and more deadlines that are more important. As a side effect of that I’ve put on a lot of muscle, I kind of just ended up this size ha ha. I try to take it a bit more seriously now and I think it’s more than a hobby now.

I am looking forward to competing at the SPC and I’ve made it a goal of mine to do all of this without a trainer. I’ve been watching my calories very strictly, I’ve been maintaining a healthy diet since September now. I’m enjoying it becuase at the same time I can eat a lot of food, feel good about myself for being healthy, I feel healthier than I ever have in my life and my physique is getting to a place it’s never been before in a good way. I’m excited to see how I can do at the SPC using all my own knowledge that I’ve picked up un the last 3 years of training. After that who knows, I can see training being a big part of my life for years to come, I never see myself not going to the gym.

 

You can follow Dennis on Instagram @k1ngpenguin and @massstandrews

Read all about Ultimate MASS and see the latest standings on the Ultimate MASS page HERE

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